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at 9:15, the impact of new leadership in china on u.s. relations. president obama traveling in parts of asia. we will have those segments, plus, we will take a look at the papers and take your phone calls as well "washington journal ."shington, we will see you then. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> next, a discussion on the future of u.s. diplomacy. after that, a forum on the effectiveness of al-qaeda in yemen. >> a former state department officials from the obama and george w. bush administration's discuss public diplomacy in a tough budget in vermont. the discuss the effectiveness of student exchange programs and government-backed broadcasting outlets, like "voice of america." the george washington school of international affairs hosted this event tuesday. this is an hour and 45 minutes. >> that is public diplomacy in action. [laughter] i'm a professor here at gw and the director of the institute for public policy and global communication. you can find us on twitter @ip dgc. we're also on fa
have given us arab awaking 101, 201 and 301. >> next, steve ratner talks about addressing the fiscal cliff. of he was joined by the state department's chief economist at the world affairs council to talk about president obama's second term and policy changes ahead. this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction. lori has said to me that since we started a bit late, provided it's okay with our speakers, we'll run a little built late, maybe five or ten after two. i'm going to ask them questions for about 40 minutes and then throw the floor open to you. so get your notebooks out and your questions, you can grill them in a moment. before starting, lori asked me to set the frame a little bit and to talk just for a moment about the u.s. competitiveness and the u.s. economy in a global context. and their actually was an oecd report that came out this morning that does that admirably. this report predicts that within four years, by 2016, the chinese economy will be bigger than the economy. and what the oecd report sort of further says, it's a great report. if
clear yesterday that he is open to new ideas. the u.s. cannot afford tax cuts that were passed 10 years ago -- over 10 years ago now. he feels that the most fair way to pick our revenue shortfall is by raising revenue from the very top. >> explained to everyone, if you can. under balsams and, it was predicted that we have -- bowl es-simpson, it was predicted that we would have 16 trillion dollars. even if you have that, why is that ok to have 22 trillion dollars of debt at in 10 years? by the is that considered still a good thing to do? -- why is that considered still a good thing to do it? >> the best capacity is the size of the debt relative to the economy. what the president has proposed is to put us on a path where the debt is stabilized and we are coming down relative to gdp. >> it is still 100% of gdp. >> i would explain a little bit about the numbers. that is the 16 trillion dollar figure that you mentioned earlier. i do nothing that is inappropriate way of measuring our debt. it is not the measure of that that is economic relevant. >> ten or 12? >> closer to 12. >> ok. the unemp
. are you using that risk shipping process to bring your vendors up to standards, and i would be interested in the tape on using the contracting process rather than the regulatory process. >> okay. we already doing that. we have standard language in every language, that it will follow the nasa security policies and procedures. we have created that and put that together, and we also have the regulations that massive supplements to that that speaks to that. we have also addressed it that way. that is the minimum of what you have to do. what we need to do is raise the bar. once that language is in there, maybe five years old or 10 years old or even five minutes old, five minutes later, the bar is raised and it is continually vigilant. and the challenge is how you can tinley pulled accountability to the contractor for things that are always changing. there is no easy answer to that. you just keep plugging along. >> and you say that is a better solution than doing it as a blanket regulation, even across specific sectors? >> i'm saying that that is a minimum. >> i like the idea of it. the idea of
and midnight tonight, both live. that's all for us tonight. don lemon is up next. over to you, don. >>> hello, everyone, you are watching cnn and i'm don lemon. tonight, i'm in downtown columbus, ohio, at the beautiful boat house restaurant, our host here and i want to show what you thousands and thousands of people in this city did today. it's early voting in the columbus and all over the state of ohio, voters here got one weekend to cast votes ahead of election day, just one weekend. last election, they could vote on five weekends before the election. so, these people bundled up against the cold, i was out there with them today. they waited in very long lines here in columbus, some of them for two hours or more to pick a man to award their state's 18 electoral votes. and a brand new poll to show you, a nationwide poll of likely voters who were asked just one question, who do you support for president of the united states? and if you thought the race was close up to now, i want you to take a look at this. 49%, 49%. president obama and mitt romney, nationwide among likely voters. that poll wa
off the magnet. .. who are using undocumented workers. that will cut down the flow by about 90% of the border. that makes it possible to secure the border for those that are trying to come across for nefarious purposes for criminals enterprises. we can stop them at the border. then we say to those that are here in an undocumented status you are on probation paying a fine and this is to me what i find when i talk to people the most emotional issue in all of this is language. i find americans across the generations don't want us to have to sing the national anthem in two languages at the world series. they won the national anthem in english even if they were american. so they have to agree if they want to stay here permanently they have to agree to read, write and speak english. i find that among the undocumented workers they have no problem with this. they want to learn english. they understand that to live the american dream they have to learn to speak english. it's only liberals who inhabit college campuses and education departments who have a problem with english becoming the
is a prolific and wonderful leader. host: thank you so much for joining us today. that is our show for the "washington journal." we will take you now live to the house floor. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. eternal god, we give you thanks for giving us another day. we come to the end of a week during which some members of this people's house have come to complete their service in the congress and others have come to prepare for their opportunity to serve this great nation. it is a time of tremendous transition, a time thought with trendation and some uncertainty. send your spirit of peace and calm, let all might have confidence in your faithfulness to us and no matter what lies ahead, your grace is abundantly available. now we approach a week during which all americans will regather to remember who we are , a nation generously blessed not only by you, our god, but by courageous ancestors, faithful allies and the best good wishes of people everywher
>> sno liebee . >> thank you so much. >> is that it? does everyone clap for us? >> i'm the only clap. >>> thanks for watching "state of the union." i'm candy crowley in washington. head to cnn.com/sotu for analysis. look for us on itunes. "fareed zakaria gps" in next for our viewers in the united states. >> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a great show for you. first a rare treat. two great historians on what makes for a successful second term. jon meacham and robert carroll talk about their subjects, thomas jefferson, lyndon johnson, and a bit about barack obama as well. >>> then the conflict in gaza yet again reminds us forget about globalization and information revolution. if you want to understand the world, look at geography. nations are still bound by it, says robert kaplan, who uses maps to show us what to worry about. you won't want to miss this. >>> and the middle class is rising. no, not here in the united states, but right next door in latin america, and it will have hug
could give us a quick reply. guest: the long-term future of the country will depend on a lot of things. the u.s. is taking a lot of steps right now to right the ship. labor may be one of them. taxation may be one of them. there are some estimates that we can be energy self-sufficient in the next 30, 40 years, so maybe that helps. this is a very complex issue. it has to be resolved. there has to be a happy medium there. whether or not it is because these ceos are boring abroad for certain things or not, that is up for debate. i'm certainly not one who will take a position on that because i don't know enough about it to make that call. there are a lot of very smart people out there, who we should respect, they are very good at what they do and they are still debating about what the proper solutions to this is. all right now, this is why we're seeing such a huge amount of debate going on in d.c. and in board rooms across the country. washington, d.c. host: there have been reports that secretary geithner will play a role in these talks. guest: the economic team is in place right now. this
threatened to stop that, he used all his tools of public service to help him win the battle. here are a couple of those tools he had, neil armstrong, tom stafford, part of a bipartisan coalition to put the united states on a path to go into orbit. as a boy who grew up within a mile and a half of the johnson space center, i saw ralph hall make history, that my kids, your kids, can see americans go into space. one more slide. we've all talked about the children earlier this year, because you did that, my kid said, dad, let's jump out of a plane when i turn 18. thank you, mr. chairman, you made a difference in my life and a difference to so many people. mr. smith: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from florida, bill posey. mr. posey: thank you, mr. chairman. i appreciate the opportunity to join with me colleagues in recognizing chairman ralph hall for his tenure as chairman of the house science committee. during his service, he reached acrong the -- across the aisle and forged bipartisan coalitions to support important legislation and no program, in my view, has benefited more if
excellent idea. unfortunately, only one-third of that is going to be used. so $200 million is going to go unspent that can go out and serve unserved america today. the same issue will be in front of us in 2013. that's what windstream's waiver is all about, is there other ways to think about this other than setting the 775 limit. and beyond that i think getting on to the model that we need going forward for universal service funding. the industry, the usta has put forth a model, but the fcc has to come up with their own model which will drive caf ii is what we're calling it, the connect america fund 2, so that's where the biggest bang for the buck will be in our business. because remember, as we looked at these more than minor changes in the financials of the telephone companies across the country, it was so important that we do these two things coincidentally. we kind of got a little bit out of sync. we've gotten one done very effectively, efficiently and fast. it's happen realtime, it's showing up in the numbers today, we've just got to work this usf thing out x it's about the cons
that question -- the roles of our committee are you cannot use something that you learned in a classified session. i can give you my assessment based on questions, my investigation, that what susan rice did was use talking points, pulled out originally by the cia signed off by the intelligence community, those were requested by the house committee. the intelligence committee sign off of it. the key was there were unclassified talking points at an early stage. i do not think she should be pelerine for this. she did what i would have done or anybody else would have done that was going on a weekend show. you would have said what talking points can i use? you get an unclassified version. i just remember -- i just read it to the committee what i was going to tell you and questions asked. to be sure it did not violate our rules. this particularly is for people in public office because you are used to answering questions candidly to have to be restricted to what is unclassified. is very difficult for your >> did he talk about his resignation? >> [indiscernible] >> i think it is making a very div
us a lot about the state of the consumer and the u.s. economy today. so we're turning to one of the most seasoned and respected voices on wall street for help. we have dana telsey. she is our guest host for the next three hours. andrew, i'll send it over to you. >> we begin with a visit to toyland and here is toys r us. it opened its doors at 8:00 last night. and we have toys r us ceo joining us right now from the company's flagship store in times square. good morning. >> good morning. >> so i read a report you you had a big line. what's it been like all evening? >> it's been great. we did have a big line. we're at 44th and broadway.line went all the the way to 45th street and then down 45th all the way to 6th avenue. it was huge. people came in in a real celebratory mood. people ate ice cream, relaxed with their kids. i've never seen a black friday like this before, but 8:00 hour worked really well for families. >> let's talk about sales. how did it go overnight? >> we're just starting. this is 5:00 a.m. on black friday morning. we're really just starting. we have about a b.
protect u.s. personnel. >> the president has been skipping his daily intelligence briefings. >> with respect to iran i want to see a diplomatic resolution to the problem. >> the president's iran policy lacks credibility. the question is whether or not is whether the defense budget is big enough to deal with the major crisis and potential challenges around the world. >> as far as the middle east is concerned, his national policy has been abysmal failure. >> the arrogance and dishonesty is breathtaking. >> there is a circle the wagon operation around barack obama that nobody is going to penetrate. >> very close con tackle with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and obviously israel which is having already grave concerns as we do about movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. >> are we better off in the middle east now than we were four years ago? absolutely not. why? because the policies of the administration and the way its been handling itself. >> when a president of the united states apologizes to religious fan
in the latest incident are real. as with the target. unmanned u.s. predator surveillance graft. the incident was real. though the timing is perhaps, perhaps suspect. one week ago. six days before the u.s. election. national security correspondent jennifer griffin is following this breaking story from the pentagon. >> reporter: at 4:50 a.m. november 1, days before the u.s. presidential election, two iranian su-25 frog foot fighter jets like these intercepted and fired twice upon an unmanned, unarmed u.s. m-2-1 predator drone over the persian gulf. it's the first time the iranians ever fired on a u.s. drone. the shots missed on both attempted. iran's fighter pilots briefly pursued the drone that landed safely at an undisclosed location. >> incident occurred over international waters. 16 nautical miles off the coastline. aircraft was never in iranian air space. it was always flying in international air space. the internationally recognized territorial limit is 12 nautical miles off the coast. we never entered the 12 nautical mile limit. >> asked whether the incident was an act of war, the penta
to train. specialist nelson is just one of 60 -- 60 u.s. service members who have been killed this year by the afghans that they were sent to train. i don't know where the outrage is by the united states congress. i am very disappointed in both parties, their leadership to allow our young men and women to stay in a war that has no end to it, makes no sense to the american people. in fact, mr. speaker, the american people have said time after time, poll after poll that they want to bring our troops home now, not 2014 but now. on october 7, there was a national article written and the title was "a mother mourns a grim milestone," referring to the 2,000 american casualties from the afghan war. lisa freeman, who was interviewed in the article, who lost her son, captain matthew freeman, in 2009, he was shot by a sniper in afghanistan, ms. freeman said, i just sat here reliving the pain and wondering , where is america's outrage? where is america's concern that we're still at war? and mr. speaker, i made reference to this yesterday. the october 14 "new york times" editorial, and the title, "t
your tv and see us, it is actually sunday not monday. jon: that's right, we'll be there sunday and you be there too, please. jenna: thanks for joining us, everybody. jon: "america live" starts right now. megyn: fox news alert tempers flaring at hurricane sandy's victims face yet another day of waiting for help as forecasters warn of a possible nor'easter that may hit an already devastated east coast. welcome to "america live," i'm megyn kelly on a busy friday between politics and sandy. nearly 4 million americans spending a fourth day without any power, many of them told they will have to wait for weeks for it to be restored, and it's getting cold here in the northeast. staten island, new york one of the hardest hit communities, people there boiling in anger over what they say has been a slow to nonexistent relief effort in places. more than 80,000 people are in the dark, many are homeless because of situations like the one you see on your screen now, and 19 people have died because of the storm. supplies and patience are running out in new york and new jersey, look at these li
week before house lawmakers concerning the deadly attack on u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. molly henneberg is live in washington with the very latest on this story. >> molly: now that he stepped down, general david petraeus will not testify this up coming week at house and senate intelligence xheet committee hearings investigating the benghazi. some on capitol hill they do want to hear from him in the future. >> i hope we don't have to subpoena a four-star general and former c.i.a. director. i hope he would come voluntarily. if he won't, he will be subpoenaed. >> molly: petraeus who had been in charge of the c.i.a. since september 2011 has said the attack was in response to a protest over an anti-islam video. one g.o.p. congressman is asking questions about the timing of his departure. >> it comes days before he is set to testify before the house intelligence committee. it really begs the question what did the f.b.i. know and whether did they know it? how long did they sit on the information? i recall that petraeus briefed the senate about what happened in benghazi. did he have t
performed by national captioning institute] >> the u.s. house gavels in to begin their first bit of legislative work starting the lame duck session, four bills including on asthma inhalers and gavel back out when they finish to return for votes at 6:30 and we expect them to swear in a number of members filling out the remainder of terms for the 112th congress. we expect those to happen during the upcoming votes at 6:30 this evening. the senate also in session today and they have been dealing with a bill drk working on rules to federal land to federal hunting and fishing and the house and senate committees getting under way this week. the intelligence committees in particular off the floor, the intelligence committee of the senate and the house will be meeting in closed session to look at the attack in libya in benghazi this week. tomorrow on c-span 3, we will be covering a hearing looking at the meningitis outbreak. that is tomorrow morning at 10:00 eastern, c-span 3. the president will be hosting a news conference. we do not know the time of the news conference yet. this will be
fulfilling the commitment to us. of course, our thoughts and prayers are with you, governor, and your family. he is a governor dedicated to his people, to the rule of law, and to the future of the united states of america, and we're very pleased and honored to have him here with us today, governor rick scott. [applause] >> good morning. thank you for the introduction. the -- it's great to be here, i want to introduce you to a couple people. this is my wife, ann, married since we were 19 years old. we've been very fortunate. [applause] she makes sure if i say anything, she corrects it, he didn't really say that. she does communications. [applause] [laughter] and then my general council, and he's done a great job. [applause] so ten days after a long and con contentious presidential election, it seems our whole political system has become a constant campaign. one election barely seems to end before in the middle of another one. there is virtually no breaking in between. that leaves us tiredded and a little aggravated. a break is especially important in between elections because elections are ab
. the u.s. now part of efforts to hammer out a cease-fire in gaza as the fighting intensifies on both sides. good morning i'm jon scott. jenna: hi, everybody i'm jenna lee. air raid sirens wailing in jerusalem. [sirens blaring] jenna: you may hear those sirens, we don't hear them often over jerusalem. this is after hamas fired off a rocket aimed at the holy city. folks on your screen running for cover. word today that that rocket hit the west bank and thankfully didn't cause any injuries. the rocket, just one of the more than 1200 from hamas fired at the jewish state since a week ago. israel is targeting key hamas sites as well firing artillery shells into gaza today and going after rocket and mortar teams all along the border. all of this happening as president obama dispatched secretary of state hillary clinton to the mideast, in jerusalem, ramallah and gaza. we will start with leland vittert on the israel-gaza border. >> reporter: there are multiple reports from senior israeli officials that there will be a cease-fire deal some time in the next 12 hours. you would think that would
new jerseyersey. congressmen this is congressman frank pallone. congressman, thanks for joining us as you go ahead with your recovery efforts there and new jersey our last caller brought up some concern about being able to vote on tuesday after the damage frot the storm.aller brout up a is that going to be a problem ia blljersey? >> guest: wellguest: it may be n the sense of people being able to access a polling place. now, every authority whether it is the governor or the county clerk's -- they assured us that there will be places to vote. but if we have places to vote that are significantly distant from where people traditionally do vote, or where there is an access problem -- that does pose a problem. we have to make sure that there is a polling place that is operational, and in a reasonable location for people to vote. you cannot tell people that are in one town that they have got to go to another town to vote. first of all, many of them will not have transportation and you cannot even get gas for the most part. it is a concerned. the concern is real. we have got to make sure t
live. that's all for us tonight. don lemon is up next. >>> hello, everyone. you're watching cnn. i'm in downtown columbus, ohio. i want to show you what thousands and thousands of people did today. it's early voting in columbus, and all over the state of ohio, voters here got one weekend to cast votes ahead of election day, just one weekend. last election, they could vote on five weekends before the election. so, these people bundled up against the cold. i was out there with them today. they waited in very long lines here in columbus. some of them for 2 hours or more, to pick a man to award their state's 18 electoral votes. there's a brand-new poll to show you. a nationwide poll of likely voters who are asked just one question. who do you support for president of the united states? and if you thought the race was close, up until now, take a look at this. 49%, 49%, president obama and mitt romney, nationwide among likely voters. that poll was taken just this weekend by cnn and orc international. three other polls released today show the two candidates tied, as well. talk about natio
, the u.s. ambassador, susan rice, meets with some of her toughest critics. and apparently they don't like what she has to say. >> we are significantly troubled by many of the answers that we got and some we didn't get. more disturbed now than i was before. >> shepard: republican senators criticizing ambassador rice for her initial comments on the libya consulate attack. >> ambassador rice has no responsibility for collecting, analyzing and providing intelligence. >> shepard: tonight the ambassador responds. >>> plus, the people of egypt trying to avoid trading one dictator for another. fighting back against a president who gave himself new powers. tonight a potential crisis point as the leader tries to put himself above the law. and how will the u.s. handle this? >>> plus, the chances of winning are ridiculously low. but millions of us are still lining up for a shot at a record powerball jackpot. >> lucky, lucky, lotto win. >> shepard: tonight a look at the actual odds of winning it all. but first from fox this tuesday night, three republican senators now say they cannot support the u.n.
, we thank you for that support. without which we couldn't do this program. it's a pleasure for us to have with us this morning, the chief of staff of the united states army, general ray odierno. general odierno is from new jersey. anybody who is from new jersey these days has been a little bit distracted. new jersey took the brunt of the storm. i grew up in louisiana. we are sort of used to this sort of thing, but we don't usually have hurricanes that have a wind chill and snowfall associated with them. which complicates matters. i hope everyone's all right up there this morning. we have been doing this series recently focusing on where are the military services going? it's a very important point of history. general odierno started in the army back during not the last draw down but the one before that. the one after vietnam. those of you who have been coming to our events know we have been talking about draw downs for some time now. eventually it had to get here and we are now at the cusp of one. we don't know how long, far, or deep. but there are a lot of lessons from the past th
they knew and scrubbed out that information so susan rice either didn't have it or didn't use it when she went on the television talk shows on sunday. >> dave: the thing i can't figure out, david petraeus on friday said that again, i knew from the start, we knew from the start it was terrorism. why in those talking points was there ever any mention of a youtube video and a spontaneous protest, if the intelligence community knew what it was, why was that ever a part of the talking points, another question we likely will not get an answer to, don't hold your breath. >> clayton: as peter king talked about yesterday, the bureaucratic way of questioning them. >> dave: getting susan rice. >> clayton: protocol, to get the answers and she may not know anyway. >> at one point in the weekly standard it says, the president says we're after an election now i think it's important for us to find out exactly what happened in benghazi and i'm happy to cooperate in any way the congress wants and then the writer here, steven hayes goes on, was it not important before the election. >> clayton: what did it h
in particular to this president's view of us as a world power, specifically as a pacific power. but this trip happens to be going on while something worrying and compelling is happening in a totally unrelated part of the world very far away. so there's our president in thailand standing there with the prime minister of thailand. but our president in the setting is fielding questions about something that's going on 4,000 miles away. around the other side of the globe in the middle east. >> there's no country on earth that would tolerate missiles raining down on its citizens from outside its borders. so we are fully supportive of israel's right to defend itself from missiles landing on people's homes and workplaces and potentially killing civilians. my message to all of them was that israel has every right to expect that it does not have missiles fired into its territory. if that can be accomplished without a ramping up of military activity in gaza, that's preferable. not just for the people of gaza, it's also preferable for israelis because if israeli troops are in gaza, they are much more at
elections. as well as a growing pressure from congress as will some u.s. allies in the region against diplomacy. focus shifted to sanctions and tehran responded by further expanding its nuclear program leaving both sides worse off today than they were a few years ago. in the meantime, sanctions have held iranian middle class for the impoverished population while the regime's repression and human rights abuses have continued to intensify and its nuclear program has continued to expand. but a new window for opportunity for diplomacy has opened through obama's convincing real election, and in the next few months, up until the iranian new year, both sides enjoy maximum political space and maneuverability to negotiate effectively. the logic of diplomacy is obvious. it's the only option that can truly resolve the issue. sanctions can cripple iran's economy at the expense of destiny that pro-democracy movement there, but sanctions alone cannot resolve this issue. the military option can set back the program for a year or two but only at the expense of ensuring that eventually iran eventually
gretchen carlson here to help us out. >> gretchen: i saw that word. you have it? >> it is. headquarters. "fox and friends" starts tomorrow. for our election coverage we'll be with you here at 4:00 a.m.. "fox and friends" starts right now. >> gretchen: good morning, everyone. it is monday november 5th. i am gretchen carlson. thank you for sharing the important news day. president obama and mitt romney blitz the key swing states in the next 24 hours. we are life with what you may expect. >> steve: did one word explain the president's campaign? >> at the time the republican congress and a senate candidate by the name of mitt romney. no, no, no. don't boo, vote. vote. voting is the best revenge. >> steve: he's off prompter there. reaction to the president encouraging voters to get revenge and vote for him. >> brian: drivers on the east coast are waiting hours for gas only to only to be abandoned and having to push the cars home. "fox and friends" starts right now. ♪ ♪ "fox and friends". >> gretchen: there is the american headquarters again. this is the big week so many peo
[overlapping dialogue] >> sean: on that, you ludes that bet. thank you for being with us. thank you. thank you for being with us. let not your heart be trouble. see you tomorrow night. >> greta: this is a fox news alert. in just 36 hour, former cia director david petraeus will testify about ben befnl he may be the one who knows the most about what happened on september 11. just two weeks ago, general petraeus went to libya to conduct his own investigation. so now. >>, congress will get the chance to question general petraeus about what he knows. but will it bring us closer to answering the question? n incompetence or coverup or something else? >> this president of this administration has either been guilty of cocolossal incompetence or engaged in a coverup, neither of which are acceptable to the american people. >> let me say specifically about susan rice, she has done exemp plear work. as i said before, she made an appearance at the request of the white house, in which she gave her best understanding of the intelligence that had been provided to her. if senator mccain and senator g
. named one of the most 100 powerful arab women last year, appears on u.s. cable news channels quite often and the founder and chairman of the independent think tank beirut institute. safeen, a member of the kurdistan democratic party. he's also a member of the -- was a standing-in member of the iraqi governing council of the authority in 2004. he was exiled to the u.k. and returned to his homeland and is playing a very key role in its development in the kurdistan province. let's make it a conversation, more oprah, fewer speeches, and hopefully everybody gets involved shortly. i want to begin by asking all the panelists to take a bird's eye view first. how you see the flow happening in the region generally, in syria in particular, and where do you see some connections happening. afra, would you like to begin? >> hello, everyone. good morning. i'm replacing my colleague from the syria national council. i was slightly surprised he chose me because he knows i'm in the non-violent movement in syria, and i'm doing my ph.d. on the non-violent movement in syria, and so it's quite a privilege to b
about doing this with yemen, too which is of course in an area of the u.s. and saudi arabia to cooperate a lot on counterterrorism, on the gcc initiative to get the power not only the thing is how do you get this desperately poor country running out of everything all but once given the chance to get back on its feet. we are still working together on that. the big issues you to brief the next secretary on our iran sanctions and syria. the imposition of the current set of sanctions wouldn't have been possible without such a deal last november but if the sanctions led to iran losing up to or a little more than half of its oil exports, with saudi arabia be willing to step in and make those exports and i think with a caveat that we probably can't make up all of iran's exports whether it be a mechanism to totally shut them down because that would take the saudi production right up and leave no spare capacity which tends to be a driver for the higher oil prices. so, as the sanctions have come about, we had some bumps in the oil market particularly in the spring in anticipation, but as they've b
address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need for the securities sector reform i feel like a lot of tunisian actors interpret things very different and to some the less says that we need stronger security forces and that some of the changes, some of the modest changes we might see as positive and the very modest direction of the reform over the past year are seen by some as a cause for the week security forces and the call for incidents like the attacks on the embassies. if you can comment on this tension and how to address that. >> the iron fist notes the outrage. you want to jump in on this? >> sure. i mean, first of all i would sort of like to the secure a sector refo
. talk to your doctor today about androgel 1.62% so you can use less gel. log on now to androgeloffer.com and you could pay as little as ten dollars a month for androgel 1.62%. what are you waiting for? this is big news. >>> welcome to "newsroom international." i'm suzanne malveaux. we are taking you around the world in 60 minutes. here's what's coming up. >>> rocket attacks and air strikes. tensions escalate between israelis and palestinians. we're going to go to jerusalem for a live report. >>> the world's largest broadcaster floundering. it is chaotic. more bbc executives are stepping aside after falsely implicating a former british politician in a child sex scandal. >>> plus, we're going to take you under water. pretty cool stuff. to a one of a kind museum that's delighting divers off the coast of mexico and protecting the area's fragile reefs. >>> we begin with the latest on the bombshell story. it has led to the resignation of david petraeus. here's the latest on the players and the events. here's how it all started. it started when jill kelly, a friend of general petrae
was the chairman of the whole committee. we had an emergency briefing on may 4, asking bp to give us accurate information with regard to the flow rate into the gulf. the answer to that question, to a very large extent, determined what the response would be on an emergency basis, to deal with the impact of the spill in the gulf of mexico, the harm that it would do to the ocean, the harm that it would do to see life, the harm -- to sea life, the harm that it would do to all those employed in the gulf. it is now clear that bp was lying to congress. they were deliberately lowballing the number, because liability is directly tied to the number of barrels that flow into the ocean. if they are guilty of ordinary negligence, they would be charged with $1,100 per barrel. at 5,000 barrels per day, that is a far smaller fine and 50,000 or 60,000 barrels project -- smaller fine than 50,000 barrels or 60,000 barrels per day. the range of the fine can number from $5 billion to $21 billion. the motive for the law is very clear -- for the lie is very clear, to minimize the overall impact on bp and the other
to afghanistan is long-term, and you cannot wait us out. this is important. because al qaeda, the taliban and other associated forces under pressure in pakistan, continue to view the rugged terrain of northeastern afghanistan especially kunar province as a viable safe haven. a relentless and effective counterterrorism effort conducted by our special operation forces this year made clear we will not allow them to regain that sanctuary. as a result of prolonged military operations, al qaeda has been significantly weakened in afghanistan and pakistan. its most effective leaders are gone. its command and control have been degraded and its safe haven is shrinking. al qaeda's ability to carry out a large-scale attack on the united states has been seriously impacted. and as a result, america is safer from a 9/11-type attack. these gains are real. but it is important to point out that even with these gains, the threat from al qaeda has not been eliminated. we have slowed the primary cancer, but we know that the cancer is also spreading to other parts of the global body. two examples of that sprea
constitution provided us with the template for classless democracy. it was not achieved immediately, but it was the template. india is important in 1947 because india is the oldest nation of the post-colonial world. the indian constitution creates an ideological template for democracy. with the emergence of india, china had a different template. very interesting, we see these comparisons, two parties, congress and the chinese communist party, became the dominant force in the post independents space. both had to be discriminated because both came from economically driven needs. the chinese offered autocratic left. but had karimov -- charismatic leaders. long story short,ke i i'm waiting for the short part. >> just a little bit longer. both had charismatic leaders, but i [indiscernible] but realistic economic policies that have been following were not working. in one case, you had soft reform of the 1990's and in china's case, from hard left the hard reform. >> right. >> the corruption is causing some much turbulence in nations has actually emerge from economic reform. because an econ
should not use androgel. serious side effects include worsening of an enlarged prostate, possible increased risk of prostate cancer, lower sperm count, swelling of ankles, feet, or body, enlarged or painful breasts, problems breathing during sleep, and blood clots in the legs. tell your doctor about your medical conditions and medications, especially insulin, corticosteroids, or medicines to decrease blood clotting. talk to your doctor today about androgel 1.62% so you can use less gel. log on now to androgeloffer.com and you could pay as little as ten dollars a month for androgel 1.62%. what are you waiting for? this is big news. >>> welcome to "newsroom international." i'm suzanne malveaux. we are taking you around the world in 60 minutes. here's what's coming up. >>> rocket attacks and air strikes. tensions escalate between israelis and palestinians. we're going to go to jerusalem for a live report. >>> the world's largest broadcaster floundering. it is chaotic. more bbc executives are stepping aside after falsely implicating a former british politician in a child sex scandal.
the deadly terror attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. four americans murdered during that assault on september 11th including our ambassador. at a closed door hearing, it's happening just a week after the general admitted having an extramarital affair and stepped down as cia director. that is not the focus of today's hearing, the affair. today he's answering questions about what the administration knew about the attack and when they knew it. we'll have much more on his testimony in a moment. brand-new stories and breaking news. jon: a major meeting at the white house, president obama and congressional leaders starting to talk about how to avoid billions of dollars in tax increases and spending cuts, set to go into effect january 1st. the maker of twinkies, ding dongs and wonder bread closing down. how super storm sandy happened, what we can learn from the disaster, it's all "happening now." good morning to you on this friday. i'm jon scott. jenna: happy friday nice to have you back on the set with us. jon: thank you. jenna: a long week. jon: a little time away. jenna: we are glad
or constitutional and republican or liberal and republican. you can use any of the terms. alexander hamilton used the term "representative democracy," we're based on majority rule and consent, but that is limited by a constitution; hence, this compound regime. now, one of the major charges that the colonist raised was he, george the iii, combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution and unacknowledged by our laws giving assent to take acts of pretended legislation. now, of course, the constitution he was referring to in 1776 was the british constitution. the and sent constitution, but that con cement is the same. there was foreign jurisdiction that was going to have authority over us. we're going to examine now the ideas and practices of those who, in our time, have combined with others to subject us or attempt to to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution. well, ideas have consequences as we learned long ago from an early isi scholar, richard weaver. let's examine the ideas. the global governance project. these are not hard to find. you don't have to be invi
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